STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s

STUDIO POTTERY: Coxwold Pottery Lidded Pot by Peter Dick. With impressed mark; c1970s

Vendor
Iconic Edinburgh
Regular price
£50.00
Sale price
£50.00
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This is a very attractive stoneware pot made at the Coxwold Pottery in the late 1970s.

It has the pottery's impressed tree mark on the side, as photographed.

It has a lovely dark mustard colour with a matt chocolate band at the bottom - love the organic slipware pattern on the main body section - which looks like little buds ready to pop open on tree branches.

The pot is 5 1/4 inches in height with a diameter measuring 4 inches.

Unpacked it weights 540 grams.

The pot is in excellent condition with no condition issues: any white marks are only reflections from the light catching on the glossy glaze in the photographs.

The maker is a noted studio pottery called Peter Dick - who sadly passed away in 2012.

He was friends with Michael Cardew when he was working at Abuja in Nigeria and worked with him there in 1961. In 1962 he returned to the UK where he went to work as an apprentice to Ray Finch at Winchcombe pottery, and in 1965 he moved with his wife, Jill to Coxwold in Yorkshire to start up their own pottery.

The influences of both Cardew and Finch are evident in his pots.

A very lovely example of his work - and of course apart from being decorative is also functional - it has a little aperture in the lid for a spoon - so with the honey coloured tones to the exterior, perhaps this was intended as a honey pot ?

A very fair price for such an attracitve pot by this fine British art potter.